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Friday, December 15, 2017  

Nurses react strongly in regards to violating patient privacy Published 5/13/2008

Editor’s Note: The following letter is in response to Oklahoma’s Nursing Times’ 28, 2008 Question of the Week, "Should nurses lose licenses for filming surger?"

                                           ***

Dear Editor,

Yes, the nurses who unofficially filmed a patient’s rectal surgery and then put it on You-Tube have gone too far! They violated their patient’s trust and confidentiality. Patients have sensitive issues and must be able to trust that nurses are going to act in a discreet and professional manner. These nurses should be disciplined, which should include loss of licensure. They have also opened themselves and their hospital up to potential legal liability.

Sincerely,

Beverly B. Bowers, Ph.D., RN, CNS Assistant Dean, Faculty Development & Professional Continuing Education/ Assistant Professor - The University of Oklahoma College of Nursing

                                       ***

Dear Editor,

The individuals who took part in making a video clip of a man’s rectal surgery should surely lose their licenses! And to put it on You-Tube is way over the top! I don’t know what Philippine law is like, but common sense and a decent conscience should keep that from happening! Too severe a punishment? Certainly NOT!

Sincerely,

Joanne Paslak, RN, BSN

Oklahoma City, OK

                                           ***

Dear Editor,

My response is shared based upon the brief information shared: Yes, I think the license should be suspended for several reasons. 1. what were cell phones doing in a surgical suite? I would think that violates safety/infection control standards. 2. I understand that laughter sometimes is used and is appropriate for tension relief in tight situations, such as OR and those situations commonly occurring in ICU. This surgical procedure does NOT seem to be that type of situation. 3. An RN is considered a member of a profession and thus must be held to high standards. This behavior seems unethical and illegal to me. So yes, be harsh, as that would seem equitable and just.

Sincerely,

Betty R. Kupperschmidt, EdD, RN, CNAA, Associate Professor – University of Oklahoma

                                       ***

Dear Editor,

YES! I cannot believe any professional, whether RN, LPN, or a nursing assistant, would think this is okay. I think all their licenses should be suspended, they should be required to attend an ethics course and counseling to see if they can get any insight into their behaviors.

I would recommend revocation, if further education and counseling did not get through to them.

Sincerely,

Carol Bowers, R.N.C.D.

Atlanta, GA

                                          ***

Dear Editor,

I do feel that RNs are professionals and should be harshly punished for this violation of privacy. I do not know about the laws in the Philippines and what the nursing governing body policies and procedures states. However, the US does import many RNs from this country and if this is acceptable in the Philippines, perhaps these nurses need to be educated on the US laws.

Sincerely,

Karen Wood, MSN,RN,M.Ed

                                   ***

Dear Editor,

It’s not my responsibility to determine "punishment" for such callous and unprofessional behavior as filming OR personnel laughing and joking during rectal surgery. However, this action is heinous indeed.

When I was an innocent and idealistic student nurse in the early 70s, I did an OR rotation that forever changed how I viewed the specialty. Hopefully, these incidents are the exception, not the rule, but I was mortified by the behavior I witnessed.

My instructor assigned me to follow a breast augmentation case. I had to meet the young lady beforehand and do a thorough physical and psych/social assessment, attend the procedure and follow up post-op. Therefore, it was impossible to NOT form a professional but personal relationship with this young lady. During the surgery, physicians and nurses made inappropriate jokes involving pancakes and ensuring the blob of butter was positioned correctly. I also witnessed a surgeon and a nurse fake sexual behavior during a tonsillectomy on a pediatric patient. I was appalled.

Over the years, I’ve wondered if OR personnel made similar jokes when taking care of me and those I love. Unfortunately, I came to believe that because of the lack of personal connection to their patients as REAL HUMAN BEINGS as opposed to anesthetized pieces of meat, this behavior is probably more common than any healthcare provider or consumer of healthcare would imagine.

Sincerely,

Elissa Crocker, RN, BSN

Oklahoma City, OK

                                        ***

Editor’s Note: Any thoughts and/or responses should be sent to news@okcnursinigtimes.com.

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