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Friday, August 23, 2019  

You Wore Flip-Flops to the White House??!!Published 9/6/2005

Although I have never really kept a keen eye on footwear taboos, I could not help but wonder about all the fuss surrounding the Northwestern University women’s lacrosse team’s visit to the White House and the uproar made about some team members that chose to wear flip-flops.

I saw the picture and they were dressed well. To be honest, their shoes did not draw my attention in the least. The fact that the media was all over this issue made me realize that footwear might actually play a bigger role in our lives than I previously thought. So with my reticular activator activated, I began watching the feet of Denver and did some research on footwear in the nursing industry. Sure enough, footwear selections in nursing really do matter!

The first rule in selecting appropriate footwear is to review your employer’s dress code policy. I have had many jobs in which open-toe shoes are unacceptable; in fact, I have yet to have a job in which they are appropriate. In healthcare, hygiene is a must, and with the new Crocs craze, I wondered about open-heeled shoes. Alas, many healthcare facilities will allow you to wear Crocs; however, you still have to wear socks. The Denver School of Nursing has a policy on shoes for students that states:

Hose or socks must be worn.

Sandals or thongs are not acceptable.

Footwear selection must be safe, clean, and professional.

Just about every company has a shoe policy, and that is the first place to begin your search for appropriate shoes. But what about the vague phrase, "safe, clean, and professional?"

A safe, clean, and professional footwear choice can be made by following the second rule of shoe selection: rule number two in selecting appropriate footwear is to check out the shoe selections of those in the industry. Had the ladies of Northwestern’s lacrosse team done their White House research, they may have noticed the abundance of the traditional square-toed pumps. If your goal is to blend in and avoid being singled out, the majority rules when selecting appropriate footwear.

A student here at the Denver School of Nursing brought it to my attention that traditional Crocs were not permitted in her department because they have holes in them and pose a risk for needle sticks in the foot. This is exactly why it is important to look specifically at the shoes worn in your department of choice.

The third rule in selecting appropriate footwear is to consider comfort and the kind of work you will be doing. I know, I know, third place is no place for comfort, but you can realistically narrow your shoe selection with the first two guidelines and still find a variety of comfortable shoes to choose from.

Now, if you are the kind of person that doesn’t like to follow the crowd and likes to test the limits with regard to shoe style, look first at company guidelines to rule out any questions with regard to policy and then confirm that they are acceptable with your supervisor or human resources department. We all have our own sense of style, and feeling as though you look great can really boost your self-confidence and job performance, but spiked heels and shoe charms may do more harm than good in the healthcare setting.

By simply reviewing your company’s policy on footwear, observing those around you, and considering your workload to find a comfortable fit, you have all the key ingredients to make a successful shoe selection for your healthcare employment.

Although I have never really kept a keen eye on footwear taboos, I could not help but wonder about all the fuss surrounding the Northwestern University women’s lacrosse team’s visit to the White House and the uproar made about some team members that chose to wear flip-flops.

I saw the picture and they were dressed well. To be honest, their shoes did not draw my attention in the least. The fact that the media was all over this issue made me realize that footwear might actually play a bigger role in our lives than I previously thought. So with my reticular activator activated, I began watching the feet of Denver and did some research on footwear in the nursing industry. Sure enough, footwear selections in nursing really do matter!

The first rule in selecting appropriate footwear is to review your employer’s dress code policy. I have had many jobs in which open-toe shoes are unacceptable; in fact, I have yet to have a job in which they are appropriate. In healthcare, hygiene is a must, and with the new Crocs craze, I wondered about open-heeled shoes. Alas, many healthcare facilities will allow you to wear Crocs; however, you still have to wear socks. The Denver School of Nursing has a policy on shoes for students that states:

Hose or socks must be worn.

Sandals or thongs are not acceptable.

Footwear selection must be safe, clean, and professional.

Just about every company has a shoe policy, and that is the first place to begin your search for appropriate shoes. But what about the vague phrase, "safe, clean, and professional?"

A safe, clean, and professional footwear choice can be made by following the second rule of shoe selection: rule number two in selecting appropriate footwear is to check out the shoe selections of those in the industry. Had the ladies of Northwestern’s lacrosse team done their White House research, they may have noticed the abundance of the traditional square-toed pumps. If your goal is to blend in and avoid being singled out, the majority rules when selecting appropriate footwear.

A student here at the Denver School of Nursing brought it to my attention that traditional Crocs were not permitted in her department because they have holes in them and pose a risk for needle sticks in the foot. This is exactly why it is important to look specifically at the shoes worn in your department of choice.

The third rule in selecting appropriate footwear is to consider comfort and the kind of work you will be doing. I know, I know, third place is no place for comfort, but you can realistically narrow your shoe selection with the first two guidelines and still find a variety of comfortable shoes to choose from.

Now, if you are the kind of person that doesn’t like to follow the crowd and likes to test the limits with regard to shoe style, look first at company guidelines to rule out any questions with regard to policy and then confirm that they are acceptable with your supervisor or human resources department. We all have our own sense of style, and feeling as though you look great can really boost your self-confidence and job performance, but spiked heels and shoe charms may do more harm than good in the healthcare setting.

By simply reviewing your company’s policy on footwear, observing those around you, and considering your workload to find a comfortable fit, you have all the key ingredients to make a successful shoe selection for your healthcare employment.

Although I have never really kept a keen eye on footwear taboos, I could not help but wonder about all the fuss surrounding the Northwestern University women’s lacrosse team’s visit to the White House and the uproar made about some team members that chose to wear flip-flops.

I saw the picture and they were dressed well. To be honest, their shoes did not draw my attention in the least. The fact that the media was all over this issue made me realize that footwear might actually play a bigger role in our lives than I previously thought. So with my reticular activator activated, I began watching the feet of Denver and did some research on footwear in the nursing industry. Sure enough, footwear selections in nursing really do matter!

The first rule in selecting appropriate footwear is to review your employer’s dress code policy. I have had many jobs in which open-toe shoes are unacceptable; in fact, I have yet to have a job in which they are appropriate. In healthcare, hygiene is a must, and with the new Crocs craze, I wondered about open-heeled shoes. Alas, many healthcare facilities will allow you to wear Crocs; however, you still have to wear socks. The Denver School of Nursing has a policy on shoes for students that states:

Hose or socks must be worn.

Sandals or thongs are not acceptable.

Footwear selection must be safe, clean, and professional.

Just about every company has a shoe policy, and that is the first place to begin your search for appropriate shoes. But what about the vague phrase, "safe, clean, and professional?"

A safe, clean, and professional footwear choice can be made by following the second rule of shoe selection: rule number two in selecting appropriate footwear is to check out the shoe selections of those in the industry. Had the ladies of Northwestern’s lacrosse team done their White House research, they may have noticed the abundance of the traditional square-toed pumps. If your goal is to blend in and avoid being singled out, the majority rules when selecting appropriate footwear.

A student here at the Denver School of Nursing brought it to my attention that traditional Crocs were not permitted in her department because they have holes in them and pose a risk for needle sticks in the foot. This is exactly why it is important to look specifically at the shoes worn in your department of choice.

The third rule in selecting appropriate footwear is to consider comfort and the kind of work you will be doing. I know, I know, third place is no place for comfort, but you can realistically narrow your shoe selection with the first two guidelines and still find a variety of comfortable shoes to choose from.

Now, if you are the kind of person that doesn’t like to follow the crowd and likes to test the limits with regard to shoe style, look first at company guidelines to rule out any questions with regard to policy and then confirm that they are acceptable with your supervisor or human resources department. We all have our own sense of style, and feeling as though you look great can really boost your self-confidence and job performance, but spiked heels and shoe charms may do more harm than good in the healthcare setting.

By simply reviewing your company’s policy on footwear, observing those around you, and considering your workload to find a comfortable fit, you have all the key ingredients to make a successful shoe selection for your healthcare employment.

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